Paper Cities for your E-Reader

I’ve just released the World Fantasy Award-winning Anthology Paper Cities as an EPUB, a popular e-book format which can be read on your iPhone, Sony Reader, Barnes & Noble Nook, COOL-ER, and other devices, as well as read with such software as Stanza, Calibre, Mobipocket, etc.

The book is DRM-free, which means there’s no copy protection.

You can get it here for $9.99.

Interview at Bibliophile Stalker

Charles Tan over at Bibliophile Stalker interviews me about Sybil’s Garage, KGB, Senses Five Press, and my own fiction.  Here’s a little clip:

CT: What made you decide to include those cryptic marginalia, or music suggestions under each story/poem? (And wouldn’t it be cool if one day each magazine came packaged with a soundtrack?)

MK: For the latest issue, I created an iTunes playlist (http://www.sensesfive.com/2009/05/30/sybils-garage-no-6-playlist/), which is about 95% accurate to what appears in the magazine. I know iTunes isn’t available or convenient for parts of the world, but it’s a start.

For the musical suggestions, it’s simply because I love music. Music has always been very inspirational for me, and I thought it would be a fun way to see what others were listening to and inspired by. Kind of like peeking into someone’s record collection. Crap, I just dated myself. I should say “mp3 collection.”

For the marginalia, I’m not sure I can answer that simply. I think part of the reason I pepper it throughout the pages has to do with my obsession with detail, a desire to fill in every nook and cranny. I also think it has to do with the joy I’ve felt in finding similar cryptic messages or imagery in song lyrics, album art, comics, books, films, and other media. And then, as I dig in further, discovering what they mean. I’m purposely trying to invoke that in Sybil’s, that unexpected frisson when you suddenly discover three quarters of the way through the magazine that there’s a story written in the margins, for example. It’s no secret that my favorite film is Blade Runner, and I’ve always admired Ridley Scott’s obsessive attention to detail, the intense layering of objects, so I guess in a way I’m emulating that too.

But yeah, a Sybil’s Garage soundtrack would be brilliant. I’m actually working on something related to that, interestingly enough.

You can read the full interview here.

The Update Post

A few updates this morning:

  • For those who haven’t heard, Sybil’s Garage will be opening to submissions for our 7th issue on January 15th.  Guidelines here.
  • The World-Fantasy award winning anthology Paper Cities is now only $12 for the holidays.  Get it now.
  • Altered Fluid, my writers group, will be appearing on Jim Freund’s Hour of the Wolf on January 16th.  We will be critiquing a story by the talented writer and amateur lepidopterist Paul Berger.
  • I’ve been toying with the idea of changing the trim size of Sybil’s Garage from 7″ x 8.5″ to 6″ x 9″.  (The latter size is a common trade paperback size in the U.S.) For issues two through six, we used the “half-legal” size, which I shamelessly borrowed from such great zines as Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet and Electric Velocipede. But there are problems with that .  Most notably, the size is not an industry standard.  The printing costs are higher.  Additionally, I’d like to start selling Sybil’s as a print-on-demand title.  This would allow it to be sold on Amazon and through bookstores via distrubution.  Previously, we only sold Sybil’s at conferences, through the Senses Five website, and at a few local bookstores.  So the pluses are: cheaper printing costs and greater potential distribution.  The negatives?  We will no longer be old-skool “zine” sized.  I’d like to hear opinions from people on this, as I’m not 100% convinced.  (More like 98%).
  • I saw Avatar with my girlfriend last night.  We both enjoyed it.  It’s a totally immersive experience.  The world is rich, beautifully rendered, full of life.  Pandora seems like a real place.  Exotic, colorful, a complete biosphere.  The plot is flawed, however.  It’s chock full of stock plotlines and easy stereotypes.  Many characters are no more than cardboard (how odd that in a 3d film the flattest things were the humans themselves).  But the world is so vibrant and alive that I was able to overlook the plot flaws and engross myself in the planet’s wonders.  I’d like to see what a good writer can do with this technology.
  • Generally, it is not a good idea to be a hallucinating hipster knocking on my door at 5:30 am on a Sunday morning and claim to live in my apartment.  Additionally, knocking again at 8:00 am and claiming to know  me will not solidify your case.
  • Have a happy holiday season.

Paper Cities Wins World Fantasy Award

Just a few hours ago Paper Cities won the World Fantasy Award for best anthology.  It would have been more than enough just to hear them mention the title in front of hundreds of spectacularly talented people, to be listed along with four other amazing anthologies.  I was and still am completely beside myself because I never expected we’d win (though I wanted to, of course).  I was a nervous wreck up on the podium, I don’t know if I made any sense, but I just wanted to thank Ekaterina Sedia for chancing her fantastic anthology with a newbie publisher, and to all the authors who made the anthology the amazing thing that it is.  This is Ekaterina’s acceptance speech which I read for her:

“I am delighted and humbled to be receiving this award, but I feel that the honor belongs to the writers who contributed their amazing and unsettling visions of urban fantasy and what it can be, and to our publisher, Matt Kressel, who recognized that these stories deserved to be seen. Today, I thank you all for this honor, even though my role was secondary to your talent.

–Ekaterina Sedia”

I am delighted and humbled to be receiving this award, but I feel that the honor belongs to the writers who contributed their amazing and unsettling visions of urban fantasy and what it can be, and to our publisher, Matt Kressel, who recognized that these stories deserved to be seen. Today, I thank you all for this honor, even though my role was secondary to your talent.

Ekaterina Sedia