World Fantasy Awards & Sybil’s Garage

So it’s that time of year again for World Fantasy Award voting, and this is my humble plea for your votes in the categories of SHORT FICTION, BEST ANTHOLOGY, and SPECIAL AWARD NON-PROFESSIONAL.  Here’s what reviewers have said about Sybil’s Garage No. 7.

“Every story had something for me to like: vivid description, playful language, a character to root for, mystery, poignancy, tragedy, an intellectual puzzle, a sting in the tail.”
-SFF Portal, Alison Sinclair

Sybil’s Garage achieves a satisfyingly universal appeal, and an extremely high degree of literary quality… it is pretty wonderful stuff — beautifully produced, and never dull. The stories are a mix of slipstream, near-future, horror, comedy horror, mythic and pseudo-mythic — eschewing anything as vulgar or misleading as a neat straightjacket of genre.”
-SF Site, Seamus Sweeny

“There are some excellent stories contained in this volume.”
-Tangent Online

“It’s been awhile since an anthology had this kind of emotional impact on me…this one is highly recommended.”
– N.K. Jemisin, Hugo-nominated author of The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms.

“Beautifully designed and printed as always, Sybil’s Garage which has been one of the best small press speculative fiction journals, graduates to anthology status.  With 195 pages of fiction, poetry and graphics this is a substantial book… These [stories] are getting attention and deserve more.”
– Richard Bowes, multiple World Fantasy Award-winning author

“The always interesting ‘zine Sybil’s Garage is back with a thicker than usual issue.  It provides a stimulating mix of SF, fantasy, poetry, and slipstream.  This time around my favorite is ‘The Poincare Sutra’ by Anil Menon, a perkily told but rather dark story of a 16-year-old Coptic girl in Israel, who falls in love with a Jewish boy while her father’s past pushes him in a different direction.”
Rich Horton for Locus Magazine

Sybil’s Garage is a stylishly put together magazine, There’s plenty of poetry, art, and nonfiction in addition to the stories…My favorite was Anil Menon’s ‘The Poincaré Sutra.’ I also enjoyed stories by Swapna Kishore, Sam Ferree, Alex Dally MacFarlane, A.C. Wise, E. C. Myers, and Amy Sisson.”
Rich Horton in his yearly fiction summary

Please cast your vote for Sybil’s Garage in the following categories.  You must vote by May 31st!

ANTHOLOGY – multiple author original or reprint – single or multiple editors
1. Sybil’s Garage No. 7 — Senses Five Press (July 2010)

SPECIAL AWARD – NON-PROFESSIONAL
1. Matthew Kressel for Sybil’s Garage No. 7 — Senses Five Press (July 2010)

SHORT FICTION* – under 10,000 words
* I don’t feel it’s appropriate to pick five stories from among the eighteen that I published.  I of course loved all of them, otherwise I wouldn’t have published them!  I’ll instead list all the stories and let you pick your favorites.
“By Some Illusion” by Kathryn E. Baker
“Suicide Club” by Amy Sisson
“The Noise” by Richard Larson
“A History of Worms” by Amelia Shackelford
“Thinking Woman’s Crop of Fools” by Tom Crosshill
“The Unbeing of Once-Leela” by Swapna Kishore
“How the Future Got Better” by Eric Schaller
“The Telescope” by Megan Kurashige
“Under the Leaves” by A.C. Wise
“The Ferryman’s Toll” by Sam Ferree
“The Tale of the Six Monkeys’ Tails” by Hal Duncan
“The Poincaré Sutra” by Anil Menon
“Kid Despair in Love” by M.K. Hobson
“My Father’s Eyes” by E.C. Myers
“An Orange Tree Framed Your Body” by Alex Dally MacFarlane
“The Watcher Thorn” by Cheryl Barkauskas
“Other Things” by Terence Kuch
“The Dead Boy’s Last Poem” by Kelly Barnhill

 

Thank you for your support!

Sybil’s Garage Update

Hi folks!  It’s been a long time since I’ve posted anything to the blog, but I just wanted to give everyone an update on Sybil’s Garage.  There will be an issue this year, in 2011 (issue 8), but I don’t expect to begin reading until June at the earliest, and most likely mid-July.  The issue will debut sometime before the end of the year.  This is later than usual because of time constraints (work, personal, etc.) .  As usual, it will contain an eclectic mix of fiction, poetry & art, and again we will be releasing it as a trade-paperback.  For all intents and purposes it’s become an annual anthology (with magazine-like contents) and I’m happy with that.  Please feel free to spread the word & thanks!

Free Download of Sybil’s Garage No. 7

Sybil’s Garage No. 7 has been hailed as “a complete work of art…put together with a huge amount of love and attention to detail,” “pretty wonderful stuff — beautifully produced, and never dull,” “an extremely high degree of literary quality,” “stylishly put together,” “every story has something to like.”

I believe it’s our best issue yet, and all these fine stories and poems deserve a wider audience.

Rich Horton has said, for example, “My favorite was Anil Menon’s ‘The Poincaré Sutra.’ I also enjoyed stories by Swapna Kishore, Sam Ferree, Alex Dally MacFarlane, A.C. Wise, E. C. Myers, and Amy Sisson.”

SF Site says, “E.C. Myers’ story was one of the most moving, and in an unforced way original, stories in the collection — my joint favourite with M.K. Hobson’s ‘Kid Despair in Love.'”

And multiple World Fantasy Award winner Richard Bowes says, “My favorites among the 18 short stories were M.K Hobson ‘Kid Despair in Love’ with its not terribly distant corporate warfare, Sam Ferree’s take on Charon and the River Styx, ‘The Ferryman’s Toll,’ Kelly Barnhill’s contemporary poete maudit ‘The Dead Boy’s Last Poem’, Eugene Myers’ ‘My Father’s Eyes’ about a young man’s search for a father gone very native indeed and ‘The Noise’ by Richard Larson about the life and loves of an East Village zombie. These and the other fiction and poetry are getting attention and deserve more.”

Since it’s Hugo and Nebula season, I’ve decided to offer the issue as a free PDF download for those who are interested.  I’ll make it available until February 15th, when Nebula voting closes.  I do hope you give these stories the consideration they deserve.

Download here:
Sybil”s Garage No. 7 (PDF 7MB)

SF Site Praises Sybil’s Garage No. 7

Over at SF Site, Seamus Sweeny has a lot of nice things to say about Sybil’s Garage No. 7.  He says, “Sybil’s Garage achieves a satisfyingly universal appeal, and an extremely high degree of literary quality… it is pretty wonderful stuff — beautifully produced, and never dull. The stories are a mix of slipstream, near-future, horror, comedy horror, mythic and pseudo-mythic — eschewing anything as vulgar or misleading as a neat straightjacket of genre.”

Also, and as far as I know this is unique for reviews of the issue, they mention the poetry.  “The poems are of a high standard, and are consistently strongly-worked and compelling. Standouts include Sonya Taaffe’s ‘Candle for the Tetragrammaton,’ Jacqueline West’s ‘One October Night in Baltimore,’ and Adrienne J. Odasso’s ‘The Hyacinth Girl,’ and Marcie Lynn Tentchoff’s ‘Pathways Marked in Silver.’ West and Odasso invoke literary history, specifically the shades of Poe and Eliot. Tentchoff’s is a neat meditation on paths taken and not taken, and for my money here the recommended music (Dory Previn’s ‘Mystical Kings and Iguanas’) matches the mood and theme of the piece most naturally.”

You can read the full review here.

Best SF Praises Sybil’s Garage

Mark Watson over at Best SF praises the latest issue of Sybil’s Garage.  Mark says, “The magazine certainly oozes quality and class…[it’s] clearly put together with a huge amount of love and attention to detail…[All the stories] are very, very well written, and if it’s literary speculative fiction you’re after Sybil’s Garage has it in spades. Highlights for me were :

  • Kathryn E. Baker’s ‘By Some Illusion’ opens with a tender look at a relationship that is sensual in its focus on touch, sight, smell, taste, and whilst it is sapphic it isn’t prurient.
  • Swapna Kishore’s ‘The Unbeing of Once-Leela’ takes us to a quite different place, but with humanity still there, with karma and memories to be addressed.
  • Hal Duncan’s ‘The Tale of the Six Monkey’s Tails’ provides some Oriental monkey-based relief (which no magazine should be without.)
  • M.K. Hobson’s ‘Kid Despair in Love’ takes a slightly skew-whiff squinty look at Big Business and the CEOs who run them.”

You can read the full review here.